Sonar in the news

by olivier gaudin|

    Welcome to the roundup of blog posts and pages that mentioned Sonar last month...



    Test coverage: jaCoCo vs Clover2
    By Jakub Kurlenda, 28 December 2010

    Recently I've been doing some research in test coverage tools. In my company we've been using EMMA coverage metrics for a long time. It works well, it's reports are clean and clear, and it has very small impact on a build process. The main shortage of this library is that it does not support total coverage stats for multi-module projects. Furthermore it does not provide support for integration / functional / manual test coverage...



    Using Experts Tools to Stop Serial Developers
    By Franco Martinig, 21 December 2010

    In the television world, experts track criminals using DNA found on the crime scene. Luckily we don’t have serial killers in the software development world, but we have what I will call “serial developers”. If I had to “profile” them, I would say that they are often young, having recently completed their software development education, or worse with no formal developer training...



    Open Source Quality Management Platform: Sonar Review
    By SHAON, GAEA NEWS NETWORK, 17 December 2010

    Sonar has been a very popular quality management platform for quite some time now. The platform is billed as to continuously analyze and measure the code quality. If anyone is serious about maintaining code quality namely coding standards, best practices, complexity, and also monitor associated statistics such as the number of unit tests run and the level of code coverage should be knowing about Sonar...



    How to manage quality of Groovy / Grails code using Sonar, Quality Management Platform
    By JAYITA, GAEA NEWS NETWORK, 16th December 2010

    Java developer are well-acquainted with the two terms Groovy and Sonar. While Groovy enables them to write far more expressive and readable code, Sonar helps them manage code quality...



    Getting started with Sonar to manage your technical debt
    By Christian Hilmersson, 8th December 2010

    In fast evolving projects you are most certain to find some kind of technical debt. As architects and developers we are always looking for the best mix of flexibiltiy, clarity and maintainability in our code base. To maintain the quality of the code most project have a set of coding standards and architectural guidelines which the team should be aware of and follow. Nevertheless I’ve noticed that, and I’m sure most of you have seen or experienced this, when projects are working under hard time pressure these things tend to be put aside in favor of making the delivery on time...